Maths, English, Science – Three Tips to Keep Kids Interested

The three most essential subjects at school can be a nightmare to teach and to learn about if you’re not that interested in the subject matter. Whether you’re an experienced teaching veteran or you’re just wetting your whistle as a teaching assistant, making kids understand the importance of Science, Maths and English is essential, as they will need that knowledge as they continue on in life.
So how can you make those three subjects interesting and compelling in a way that makes your students eager to learn more? Take a look at these three helpful tips for inspiration;

Science – Horrible Science, Make it Gross and Funny!

Even the most boring subjects can be brought to life with a few comical drawings or funny jokes. If you fancy yourself as a bit of an artist, you can add diagrams to your lessons to help your pupils memorise the lessons better.

English – Write your Passion

Everyone has a subject or interest they feel passionate about. By tapping into those passions and getting your students to ‘write what they know’ you can help them learn new words, correct their own grammar and weave their own stories through their work.

Maths – Use LEGOs for Fractions

LEGO building blocks are a well-known, popular and classic toy designed to spark the imagination of children. By using them in pieces to help children to understand fractions, you bring part of that fun of playtime into the classroom and allow your pupils to put their puzzle solving skills to good use.

 

The Stress of Tests and the Danger Behind That Stress

The National Union of Teachers has stated that while regular testing is important to see how our pupils are learning, excessive testing and the importance we place on some of these tests could be having a negative effect on stress levels in young children.

Tests are a standardised way of finding out who is ‘doing well’ in education and who needs ‘a little extra help’. Unfortunately, there is no right formula for learning.

Some children who don’t work well in exam conditions are fully capable and coherent individuals, whereas others who excel in tests have difficulty solving problems on their own terms.

It is important that teachers and teaching assistants highlight the importance of tests – for nationwide purposes – as well as letting children know that it is not the be all and end all of their cognitive abilities.

It is great when test scores are high, but if the cost of high test scores is the increased stress levels and fear of failure from the children themselves, then we desperately need to re-think our educational strategy.

 

The Importance of Employability

One major part of providing a good education for our children is so that they will grow up able to hold a steady, comfortable and enjoyable job that will allow them to live. As teachers, substitute teachers, teaching assistants and supply teachers, it is our job to provide them with that level of education. However in some instances, it seems as if more stress is placed on simply meeting criteria and passing exams than building an employable repertoire.

Employability Skills

tie-349439_960_720The Chambers of Commerce has suggested that more importance should be placed on teaching children about skills that make them employable from a younger age.

By instilling these kinds of skills in our pupils, we are helping them to set up good work ethics and a strong CV for when they apply for jobs in the future.

 

Careers Education

While some advice is given to secondary school children covering the type of career they might like to pursue, more should be done to assist children in getting eventual work. Suggestions have been made for children to visit local businesses as well as museums and art galleries in order to give pupils an idea of the working world.

It should serve to reason that teaching our kids how to maintain a good professional relationship along with a strong work ethic should be of a high priority.

Get Your Kids to Read! Dangerous Literacy Levels

The National Literacy Trust has warned that low literacy levels could be incredibly dangerous for our children. It will come as no surprise to many teachers and teaching assistants across the UK that some parents and teachers are having difficulty getting their children involved in reading and reading on a regular basis. Low literacy levels and living in poverty combined can create a reinforcing cycle that will be difficult to break if left unaided in adulthood. So why should we be spending more time on getting our kids to read?

Higher Literacy = Better Communication

father-and-son-reading

If you read on a regular basis, your vocabulary increases as does your understanding of certain terms, more complex words and common phrases.

By not reinforcing the importance of reading in our children, parents are starving their children of the opportunity to engage in worthwhile and intelligent conversation.

 

Reading Inspires and Encourages Children to Use their own Skills

As a generation, we often rely a little too much on all the technology available at our fingertips. If we don’t know something, we are likely to Google it. In short we have become a little lazy. Just because all this information is readily available, it doesn’t mean we no longer have the need for books and for absorbing information. There may be a time where we don’t have Google, and this is where encouraging children to read on a regular basis can help. They absorb the information presented to them in books and will learn to rely on their own knowledge and experience, instead of just what they can find on Google.

70% of Schools Have Children Learning on Tablets

tablet-275x300Modern technology is storming the way we look at everyday life. With more and more children becoming tech-savvy with the latest gadgets, according to recent research around 70% of UK primary and secondary schools use tablet computers in lessons.

In some cases – around 9% – there are schools where each individual has their own tablet with which they can learn.

Although this trend has vastly grown in popularity with the recent boom of tablets and smart phones in the past few years, there is no physical evidence to suggest that the use of these tablets have improved learning capabilities.

However this is not necessarily a bad thing, as pupils can often access the internet through mobile devices which is widely known as the ‘world’s best procrastination device’ so with a little focus and a push in the right direction, tablets can easily be integrated into day to day teaching.

Children use the internet to connect socially with their friends and relatives, and many young children know well enough how to operate a tablet and how to perform a search on Google, so it is widely considered important for teachers and substitute teachers to incorporate these aspects of society into their teachings.

After all, the internet is a vast wealth of knowledge just waiting to be tapped into, so to deny future generations the ability to access it may be more damaging in the long run than having to figure out creative ways of preventing access to Facebook on the schools intranet system.

Training Teacher Shortage Expected

homework-300x300A teacher training shortage this term may lead to schools looking outside the UK for qualified primary teachers. It has been reported that around 32,500 people have started or plan to start teacher training courses at the start of this term in comparison to the target of 34,800 people expected to start.

This shortage of over 2000 places of well-qualified staff across the country can become a major issue if not resolved soon.

Schools will have to rely on utilising supply teachers, teaching assistants or part time teachers who do not yet have the full qualifications in this new recruitment crisis. Another solution is to increase class sizes; however this has had a negative effect on students’ learning in the past.

Despite offering bursaries worth up to £25,000 tax free to graduates training in priority subjects such as maths, sciences and languages, students training to become teachers have decreased steadily in the past few years, leaving schools with a worrying shortage.

With the possibility of a teacher shortage in store for the future, we are constantly looking for qualified supply teachers, teaching assistants and teaching support staff. Why not submit your CV with RedBox teachers today for great teaching opportunities throughout primary schools in London and the surrounding areas?

Wayne Rooney Returns

W_Rooney-188x300Earlier in November, Wayne Rooney took a trip down memory lane by visiting his old primary school before his Euro 2016 qualifier against Slovenia.

The famous footballer paid a visit to Our Lady and St Swithin’s primary school in Liverpool for a special photo shoot, where he spoke to a captivated young audience about playing for Manchester United and England.

The Pupils of Our Lady and St Swithin’s primary wore replica England kits for the picture, where Rooney is seen grinning in the centre of kids in the main hall of his old primary. The school was well prepared for his visit with a replica World Cup on display and 99 lucky pupils took time out of class to talk to the star and ask him questions about his career.

The current Headteacher, Sandra Hamilton stated that she always talks to the children about Wayne Rooney, giving the young pupils hope that one day he might come back to the school for a visit. After all their waiting, the children finally saw that dream come true and Rooney even signed the replica shirts, giving them the perfect souvenir to take home.

It is always heart-warming to see a successful student return to a school after they have achieved their dreams. Redbox Teachers focuses on bringing teachers with a passion for bringing out the creativity and individuality in children, so why not submit your CV today for a fantastic teaching opportunity?

Children Interview War Veterans for Project

Legion Scotland, the veteran’s charity has called on Aberdeen primary pupils to research their community’s involvement in World War II. The charity hopes that it will highlight the importance in listening to stories told by local members of society as it helps them to relive and learn the past through the eyes of a child in the Great War.

veteran-300x187It will show what it was like to be a child living in the Great War. Primary pupils will need to conduct a series of interviews with local people, honing in on one individual in particular to help shape up their understanding of living in World War II.

As well as interviews, the children will need to use photography to document their research, source historical artefacts and write a 500 word piece.

These projects will be collected to create an archive of first hand Scottish stories from World War II and to place emphasis on the importance of remembrance.

Whether you are looking for a part time teaching position or a permanent job as a teacher or teaching assistant, why not join Redbox today to work alongside many other world class teachers in order to provide children in schools in and around London with the support they need to grow and develop.

Longer School Days for Children?

Suggestions made by the Department for Education to combat underachievement in children from working-class backgrounds have included allusions to a possible ‘longer school day’ in order to give children more time to complete their work in a supportive environment.

imagesHowever many teachers and parents have lashed out against this theory stating that children need to have a life outside of school in which they can relax, unwind and enjoy some quiet time before going to bed.

As it stands children who come home from school after 3:30 are already pretty tired and making the school day even longer may damage their attention span and could even have the adverse effect on concentration.

With autumn settling in, a longer school day could mean that children may have to make the walk home in the dark, which not many parents are happy about.

Plus it could be a bad news for teachers, particularly those who teach in London and nearby as classes are already over saturated and a longer working day will mean less time to mark work and plan future lessons among other things.

There have been other suggestions brought forward to help combat underachievement including the establishment of a possible ‘homework club’ but it has been expressed that it would be better if it were run by parents and volunteers otherwise the concept of ‘home-work’ would be completely nullified.

What do you think? Longer school days which give children more time to think and study? Or is this just adding more strain to a possibly already over saturated system?

Children to be Taught Classical Music

In order to alleviate fears that children are not being taught about classical music, ten pieces of classical music are going to be introduced to the syllabus by composers from Beethoven and Stravinsky among others.

music

The project is known as Ten Pieces and will be introduced into lessons through a film.

Around 150 arts organisations have signed up to the scheme and will visit schools in order to assist with the running of interactive workshops regarding the composed works.

 

In addition, there has also been interest among members of BBC orchestras to concerts being held at schools. This project has stemmed from the idea that not many children will have had the chance to listen or react to classical music, so to incorporate it into schools will be a great way to inspire children with classical music.

Classical music has been known to increase creativity and have a positive impact on behaviour in children, so it is important to give these children a chance to experience the music for themselves at a younger age.

With a wide range of different teaching jobs available for schools in and around London, Redbox is a professional teaching agency dedicated to helping you to find your dream career. Send in your CV to us today!