Teaching Primary Children Code

As primary support teachers, we endeavour to teach our pupils a range of subjects designed to help give them a general understanding of the world we live in, while helping them to develop their own strengths and give them positive encouragement to continue to learn. Essential subjects include Maths, History and Languages, however Computer Science has taken a back seat in primary learning and it is becoming more important than ever that this is changed in our classes.

code-300x23215 years ago we were on the cusp of a technological revolution.

Information Technology started to creep into our everyday lives and although we as adults began to learn and incorporate IT into our daily routine, it has only garnered interest from younger children in the past few years, with the rise of mobile technology.

In order to ensure the future success of the technological age it is important that we teach young children Computer Science as soon as possible, as it opens up countless new job opportunities when you are Computer literate.

Plus, within Computer Science you will also gain a broader understanding of a number of other subjects including Literacy, Numeracy and the ability to express ourselves creatively.

Children are fast learners and are ready to absorb everything that comes their way. Why not introduce them into a world full of new opportunities with a comprehensive Computer Science course, even if it is just for one hour a week?

70% of Schools Have Children Learning on Tablets

tablet-275x300Modern technology is storming the way we look at everyday life. With more and more children becoming tech-savvy with the latest gadgets, according to recent research around 70% of UK primary and secondary schools use tablet computers in lessons.

In some cases – around 9% – there are schools where each individual has their own tablet with which they can learn.

Although this trend has vastly grown in popularity with the recent boom of tablets and smart phones in the past few years, there is no physical evidence to suggest that the use of these tablets have improved learning capabilities.

However this is not necessarily a bad thing, as pupils can often access the internet through mobile devices which is widely known as the ‘world’s best procrastination device’ so with a little focus and a push in the right direction, tablets can easily be integrated into day to day teaching.

Children use the internet to connect socially with their friends and relatives, and many young children know well enough how to operate a tablet and how to perform a search on Google, so it is widely considered important for teachers and substitute teachers to incorporate these aspects of society into their teachings.

After all, the internet is a vast wealth of knowledge just waiting to be tapped into, so to deny future generations the ability to access it may be more damaging in the long run than having to figure out creative ways of preventing access to Facebook on the schools intranet system.