Keep the Culture!

culture

Teachers and teaching assistants are being placed under an increasing amount of pressure to teach children everything they need to know. The pressure is really on to help them become high functioning and successful adults later in life. However with long hours, large classes and a shortage of both teachers and funding in many cases, it is getting harder and harder for teachers to be able to fulfil this promise to parents.

Culture is extremely important in education; however it can often be cut in favour of more ‘practical subjects ‘such as maths and science. It is crucial to be able to have a healthy balance of all sorts of subjects throughout every child’s education in order to give them enough choice to develop their own skills and interests. A balanced education is also important as it allows children to relax into less ‘stressful’ subjects, or to find their own path as well as learning about the past and gaining important communication skills.

It is for this reason that culture should remain a primary function for many schools. Allowing students time to create their own cultural art pieces, be it a sculpture, a story, a piece of music or something as small as a ‘what they did over the summer’, is a crucial aspect of giving children as much of a chance as they can of having a well-rounded future.

Ormiston Trust Offers Rent to Teachers in Deprived Areas

When it comes to teaching in highly populated and urban areas, it can be hard for a full time or even part time teacher to find decent accommodation that is a reasonable distance from the school. Finding work in London can be quite difficult because of this, particularly if you would really rather not spend a few hours on commuting to work every day.

rent rbIf you want to teach at a school in a deprived or run-down area, finding a good place to rent where you feel safe and secure can make it a little bit harder.

This is probably why, in an attempt to boost teacher recruitment in under-developed areas, the charity Ormiston Academies Trust, has plans to extend offers of subsidised houses to teachers in these areas.

The Trust – consisting of 30 primary and secondary schools – has said that providing cheaper housing, closer to the schools would make it more attractive to teachers looking for work. It can be hard to find any sort of accommodation when teaching supply or substitute teaching, so this could make a huge difference to the amount of applicants they get each year.

This scheme has come about as a result of two test schools providing this service at Grimsby and the Isle of Wight. There are high hopes that this will help to tackle the teacher deficiency in under-developed and deprived areas.

Mixing up the Classroom Seating

Seating arrangements are a great way to encourage quick order in your class, however it can get boring sitting the same pupils next to each other week in and week out and your class will more than likely have a few troublemakers that like to stir things up. So what can be done?
download-300x160Why not try this simple exercise? Give each child a piece of paper to write on and ask them to write down the names of four children they would like to sit with the following week as well as a student that they feel has been a good Samaritan that week. You can get them to write the papers anonymously or you can ask them to write their names on the top.
hold-hands-300x292What this does, aside from giving your pupils a position to strive towards – Good Samaritan – is it will highlight children in your class that may be having difficulties making friends. It will show who was popular last week and who may not be so popular this week. It may even help to highlight those students which may be bullied, or those that are struggling with their class work.

After all, a cry for help is not always done in the form of a literal, verbal cry for help, and reading between the lines with exercises such as this is a great way to see, even as a supply teacher how your pupils are really doing when it comes to building friendships and relationships which are going to be essential life skills as they grow older.

Schools No Longer Teaching Creationism

All public schools throughout the UK will now be prevented from teaching Creationism as if it were scientific fact in their classes. Although many public schools already took this into account when teaching Creationism, it has now been announced that all public funded schools as well as any existing and future academies will be following the new rule.
od-300x197The changes come as a result of ensuring that the education sector remains open minded to multiple religions and practises as a part of ‘multi-cultural Britain’. Although Creationism is still relatively important in teaching our young people how the Earth ‘came to be’ it has taken more of a back seat role in religion recently as many mainstream churches and religious traditions even go so far as to reject Creationism as a theory.
Because it lacks scientific evidence – a factor which is becoming more and more crucial every day with each new discovery we make as a species about our world – Creationism must not be taught as scientific fact. However this will not discredit the teaching of Creationism in public schools, it is just important to make sure that it is not taught as a reliable alternative to any scientific theory of our origin.

70% of Schools Have Children Learning on Tablets

tablet-275x300Modern technology is storming the way we look at everyday life. With more and more children becoming tech-savvy with the latest gadgets, according to recent research around 70% of UK primary and secondary schools use tablet computers in lessons.

In some cases – around 9% – there are schools where each individual has their own tablet with which they can learn.

Although this trend has vastly grown in popularity with the recent boom of tablets and smart phones in the past few years, there is no physical evidence to suggest that the use of these tablets have improved learning capabilities.

However this is not necessarily a bad thing, as pupils can often access the internet through mobile devices which is widely known as the ‘world’s best procrastination device’ so with a little focus and a push in the right direction, tablets can easily be integrated into day to day teaching.

Children use the internet to connect socially with their friends and relatives, and many young children know well enough how to operate a tablet and how to perform a search on Google, so it is widely considered important for teachers and substitute teachers to incorporate these aspects of society into their teachings.

After all, the internet is a vast wealth of knowledge just waiting to be tapped into, so to deny future generations the ability to access it may be more damaging in the long run than having to figure out creative ways of preventing access to Facebook on the schools intranet system.

Tips For your first PGCE Observation

tick-300x296When it comes to your first PGCE observation as a teacher in training, it is important to remember that the appraising tutor has probably seen hundreds of lessons of the same type, so the chances are that at least 10% of those lessons were complete disasters, so they’re prepared for absolutely anything to happen.

The point of these appraisals is to help you build upon existing traits and to help improve upon your weaker teaching points so that you can grow and learn as a teacher in your own right.

These tutors are not here to assess your ability; they are merely there to help you develop your own skills as a fully fledged teacher.

Know your subject well as many teachers in training might try out an entirely new subject in order to impress the tutor; however this can lead to unplanned detours as children will react in ways that you often won’t expect. Make copies of everything; the lesson plan, resources, work sheets etc. so that you can give them to your support staff as well as have a few spares where needed.

All in all it is important to relax and stay calm. These tutors are here to assess your ability to adapt, especially when things don’t quite go as planned. Enjoy it and remember that the most crucial thing is to make sure your pupils are learning!

Training Teacher Shortage Expected

homework-300x300A teacher training shortage this term may lead to schools looking outside the UK for qualified primary teachers. It has been reported that around 32,500 people have started or plan to start teacher training courses at the start of this term in comparison to the target of 34,800 people expected to start.

This shortage of over 2000 places of well-qualified staff across the country can become a major issue if not resolved soon.

Schools will have to rely on utilising supply teachers, teaching assistants or part time teachers who do not yet have the full qualifications in this new recruitment crisis. Another solution is to increase class sizes; however this has had a negative effect on students’ learning in the past.

Despite offering bursaries worth up to £25,000 tax free to graduates training in priority subjects such as maths, sciences and languages, students training to become teachers have decreased steadily in the past few years, leaving schools with a worrying shortage.

With the possibility of a teacher shortage in store for the future, we are constantly looking for qualified supply teachers, teaching assistants and teaching support staff. Why not submit your CV with RedBox teachers today for great teaching opportunities throughout primary schools in London and the surrounding areas?

Children Interview War Veterans for Project

Legion Scotland, the veteran’s charity has called on Aberdeen primary pupils to research their community’s involvement in World War II. The charity hopes that it will highlight the importance in listening to stories told by local members of society as it helps them to relive and learn the past through the eyes of a child in the Great War.

veteran-300x187It will show what it was like to be a child living in the Great War. Primary pupils will need to conduct a series of interviews with local people, honing in on one individual in particular to help shape up their understanding of living in World War II.

As well as interviews, the children will need to use photography to document their research, source historical artefacts and write a 500 word piece.

These projects will be collected to create an archive of first hand Scottish stories from World War II and to place emphasis on the importance of remembrance.

Whether you are looking for a part time teaching position or a permanent job as a teacher or teaching assistant, why not join Redbox today to work alongside many other world class teachers in order to provide children in schools in and around London with the support they need to grow and develop.

Longer School Days for Children?

Suggestions made by the Department for Education to combat underachievement in children from working-class backgrounds have included allusions to a possible ‘longer school day’ in order to give children more time to complete their work in a supportive environment.

imagesHowever many teachers and parents have lashed out against this theory stating that children need to have a life outside of school in which they can relax, unwind and enjoy some quiet time before going to bed.

As it stands children who come home from school after 3:30 are already pretty tired and making the school day even longer may damage their attention span and could even have the adverse effect on concentration.

With autumn settling in, a longer school day could mean that children may have to make the walk home in the dark, which not many parents are happy about.

Plus it could be a bad news for teachers, particularly those who teach in London and nearby as classes are already over saturated and a longer working day will mean less time to mark work and plan future lessons among other things.

There have been other suggestions brought forward to help combat underachievement including the establishment of a possible ‘homework club’ but it has been expressed that it would be better if it were run by parents and volunteers otherwise the concept of ‘home-work’ would be completely nullified.

What do you think? Longer school days which give children more time to think and study? Or is this just adding more strain to a possibly already over saturated system?

Children to be Taught Classical Music

In order to alleviate fears that children are not being taught about classical music, ten pieces of classical music are going to be introduced to the syllabus by composers from Beethoven and Stravinsky among others.

music

The project is known as Ten Pieces and will be introduced into lessons through a film.

Around 150 arts organisations have signed up to the scheme and will visit schools in order to assist with the running of interactive workshops regarding the composed works.

 

In addition, there has also been interest among members of BBC orchestras to concerts being held at schools. This project has stemmed from the idea that not many children will have had the chance to listen or react to classical music, so to incorporate it into schools will be a great way to inspire children with classical music.

Classical music has been known to increase creativity and have a positive impact on behaviour in children, so it is important to give these children a chance to experience the music for themselves at a younger age.

With a wide range of different teaching jobs available for schools in and around London, Redbox is a professional teaching agency dedicated to helping you to find your dream career. Send in your CV to us today!